Turnips

Turnips

Turnips can be eaten from top to bottom, or more fittingly, root to bulb. The small, tender varieties are grown for human consumption and both the bulb and leaves, which resemble mustard greens, can be enjoyed. The larger varieties, on the other hand, are often used as feed for livestock and the the roots provide a valuable energy source for young animals.

Turnips prefer cold-weather climates and the most common variety is white-skinned with a purple, red, or green blush on the top where the sun has hit. Smaller turnips tend to be sweeter and can be eaten raw, adding a nice crunch to salads, while larger turnips have a nuttier taste and are best when blanched or boiled. To avoid a bitter flavor, place a potato in the water directly next to the turnip.

In Season

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

Articles about Turnips

August 01, 2014

Rabbits, Pigs, and Herbs in Marin County

Take a behind-the-scenes look at Devil’s Gulch Ranch and Allstar Organics in Nicasio.

July 31, 2014

Volunteers of the Month: Summer Interns

CUESA says farewell and thanks to our summer interns, Janelle, Henry, and, Sarah.

July 25, 2014

The Great Tomato Debate

Confused by terms like heirloom, open-pollinated, hybrid, and GMO? We’ll help you sort them out.

July 18, 2014

Meet Marcy

CUESA is excited to welcome our new executive director, Marcy Coburn! Find out what inspires her work.

July 11, 2014

Farm Tripping

Summer is prime time for agritourism. Here’s our list of local U-picks, tours, and other farm fun.

About CUESA

CUESA (Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture) is dedicated to cultivating a sustainable food system through the operation of the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market and its educational programs. Learn More »