If you think the cauliflower looks a lot like broccolli, well you’re spot on. Like it’s green cousin, the cauliflower is a member of the Brassicaceae family and its white buds can be cooked, boiled, pickled, or eaten raw. Unlike other members of this plant group, though, the stems and leaves are not usually used for culinary purposes, except to flavor stocks.

There are four major groups of cauliflower species: Italian, Northwest European biennial, Northern European annuals, and Asian. And although the white cauliflower is the most recognizable of the bunch, this vegetable also comes in orange, green, and purple varieties: the orange cauliflower originated from a natural mutant plant in Canada; the green is also referred to as Romanesco; and the vibrant purple version is a result of an antioxidant that is also found in purple cabbage and red wine.

In Season

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

Recipes with Cauliflower

Cauliflower Cheese

Leanne Brown, Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day

Cauliflower Zahlouk

Joyce Goldstein, Inside the California Food Revolution

Mashed Cauliflower with Leeks, Kale, and Tomatoes

Charles Vollmar, Epicurean Exchange

Warm Brown Rice, Cauliflower, and Escarole Salad with Garlic Vinaigrette

Lauren Kiino, Il Cane Rosso

Articles about Cauliflower

September 30, 2011

Virtual Tour of Swanton Berry Farm

Take a virtual tour of Swanton Berry Farm, where the berries are union-grown, organic, and delicious.

December 01, 2006

Cruciferous Crops

Lucky for us, one of the most cold-tolerant plant families encompasses more vegetables than any other.


CUESA (Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture) is dedicated to cultivating a sustainable food system through the operation of farmers markets and educational programs. Learn More »